Bryant Lake Bowl

810 W. Lake St., Mpls Open 8 am‑2am daily

Restaurant/Bowling (612) 825‑3737 Theater (612) 825‑8949

Theater

Café Scientifique

Presented by The Bell Museum of Natural History

The Bell Museum's Café Scientifique is a happy hour exchange of ideas about science, environment, and popular culture featuring experts from a variety of fields on diverse and often provocative topics. 

 

Previous performances

September topic: The Short and Happy Life of a Serengeti Lion with Dr. Craig Packer

Tuesday, September 17 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm

October Topic: Birding for These Modern Times with Sharon Stiteler, the Birdchick

Tuesday, October 15 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
Sharon Stiteler is the author of three books and the enormously popular Birdchick blog. She keeps bees with Neil Gaiman (and photographs birds in his backyard,) and travels 40 weeks of the year to spy on birds all over the world. 
During one of her rare stints at home in Minnesota, and hot on the heels of a multi-week European birding trek, Stiteler will visit Café Scientifique. Her presentation will be based on her latest book, 1001 Secrets Every Birder Should Know, and geared toward experienced birders as well as novices and the bird-curious alike.

November topic: Insect behavior, evolutionary biology and sexual selection

Tuesday, November 19 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
How is it that insects, with their robotic demeanor and stripped-down biological toolbox, are able to accomplish so many of the same functions as humans? Tonight, evolutionary biologist Dr. Marlene Zuk gives us an account of the social behavior (and yes, the sex lives) of ants, crickets, bees, and other insects, illuminating the fact that many of the things we think of as setting humans apart--personality, learning, language--aren't so extraordinary after all. Marlene Zuk is a biologist and writer who recently moved from California to the Twin Cities, where she is a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior at the University of Minnesota. She studies sex and evolution in animals from insects to birds, and is interested in how people draw parallels between human and animal behavior. Zuk’s research has taken her around the world, in particular to Hawaii and other parts of the Pacific. Her books include Sexual Selections: What We Can and Can’t Learn About Sex from Animals; Riddled with Life: Friendly Worms, Ladybug Sex, and the Parasites that Make Us Who We Are; Sex on Six Legs: Lessons on Life, Love, and Language from the Insect World; and Paleofantasy: What Evolution Really Tells Us About Sex, Diet, and How We Live. She also writes for many popular outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, and Natural History magazine, and has been interviewed on radio shows ranging from The Splendid Table to Fresh Air.

December topic- Animal Games: Blue Jays and the "Prisoner's Dilemma" Presenter: Professor David W. Stephens

Tuesday, December 17 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
What do we observe when a bunch of birdbrains are compelled to play decision-making games? Dr. Stephens' research blends mathematical and experimental analyses to address a range of issues in behavioral ecology, especially feeding behavior and cooperation. Using psychological techniques and experimental games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma, the Stephens Lab at the University of Minnesota analyzes blue jay behaviors to create evolutionary models of learning, memory, decision-making, and other cognitive phenomena most often associated with the human mind.

Galaxy Formation and the Reionization of the Universe: Astrophysics/Golden Age of Cosmology

Tuesday, January 21 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
Presenter: Dr. Claudia Scarlata

The Cosmic Microwave Background: Astrophysics/Golden Age of Cosmology


Tuesday, February 18 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
Presenter: Dr. Clem Pryke

March topic: Conservation Ethic in Modern Agriculture Presenter: Tony Thompson

Tuesday, March 18 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
Minnesota farmer and philosopher Tony Thompson, who notably appeared in Bell Museum's Emmy award winning documentaries Troubled Waters and Minnesota: A History of the Land, will be headlining March's Café Scientifique. In acknowledgement of agriculture scientist, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and University of Minnesota alumnus Dr. Norman Borlaug's 100th birthday, Thompson will be sharing his insights into the Green Revolution "2.0", including his expert perspective on contentious industrial-scale GMO crops such as soybeans and corn, and the conservation ethic in modern technological agriculture.

April topic: Our Disappearing Bees Presenter: Marla Spivak

Tuesday, April 15 at 7:00 pm
Doors open at 6:00 pm
Over the years, honey bees have faced a series of devastating problems, including a witches' brew of diseases, parasites and pesticides that together contribute to the mass honey bee die-off known as colony collapse disorder. Now, a relatively new class of insecticides that affect the central nervous system of insects is pushing the pollinator crisis to the edge, while researchers like Marla Spivak race to discover the causes and consequences of our disappearing bees. Dr. Spivak is an entomologist and professor at the University of Minnesota, whose interest in bees began when she worked for a commercial beekeeper from New Mexico in 1975. She later completed her B.A. in Biology from Humboldt State University in northern California, and her PhD from the University of Kansas, under Dr. Orley "Chip" Taylor, in 1989. She spent two years in Costa Rica conducting her thesis research on the identification and ecology of Africanized and European honey bees. From 1989-1992 she was a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Insect Science at the University of Arizona. She began as Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota in 1993. Influenced by Martha Gilliam and Steve Taber from the USDA Bee lab in Tucson, she became interested in hygienic behavior of honey bees. This interest has expanded into studies of "social immunity", including the benefits of propolis to the immune system of honey bees, and to the health and diversity of all bee pollinators. Dr. Spivak received the prestigious "genius grant" from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation in 2010.

Past performances

Tuesday, May 20 at 7:00 pm

performance


EAT & DRINK IN YOUR SEAT!

Full bar and menu service
available throughout the performance